Can Science Prove Life After Death?

The short answer to the question can science prove life after death is—YES. The problem is not about designing objective and replicable clinical tests or even inventing machines sensitive enough to register organized consciousness outside of matter. All that would be easy in comparison to something like the Hadron Collider built to discover how matter forms at a subatomic level. The collider is a subterranean machine 17 miles (27 km) in length running under the Swiss-French border. Its development is a joint effort of European nations (CERN) and its data are sent to some 160 universities throughout the world for analysis. Nor is the problem about cost. The price tag for the Hadron Collider is already well into billions of euros. Compare this high-level, international government and university sponsored coordination and mind-boggling expense for the Hadron Collider to the small-scale, uncoordinated investigation of life after death, an enterprise which is nearly always conducted privately, and without outside funding. As science routinely invents devices that can “see” the invisible, whether in astrophysics or nuclear physics, why can’t it develop the technology it takes to prove life after death?

EXLDF00Z.jpg (400×300)

The problem is attitude. A Gallup poll on immortality found that only 16% of leading scientists believed in life after death as opposed to anywhere from 67% to 82% of the general population, according to several polls combined. And only 4% of these scientists thought it might be possible for science to prove it. Apparently they have no trouble believing in Multiverses in which a nearly infinite number of parallel universes are imperceptible or String Theory with its 11 dimensions of reality, some of them also imperceptible, and the Hidden Worlds Theory, which again hypothesizes imperceptible universes. But an afterlife? That’s just too crazy. Although this poll dates back to 1982 and so far newer ones have not been taken, the scorn and ridicule targeted at scientists who might be brave enough to propose testing for an afterlife and the subsequent loss or demotion of their professional positions are costs too high to risk. Even so, funding to test a survival hypothesis would hardly be granted.

So far evidence for survival is coming from the softer sciences, psychiatry, psychology as well as medicine and biology, with specific, potentially revolutionary hints in neurobiology, quantum biology and genetics. Even in the softer sciences, however, a person chances considerable derision if not loss of professional reputation for pursuing research in this area. Ironically, the hard sciences are doing the most to dismantle the assumption that the material universe is the only real universe—a crucial point for any argument for a non-material dimension of the dead. Astrophysics claims that 95.4% of the entire universe is not made up of the kind of matter and energy we call “real.” Less than a third of the 95.4% is composed instead of a mysterious substance called dark matter and more than 2/3rds of it is equally strange dark energy. The universe we are accustomed to thinking of as real amounts to a mere 4.6% and is composed of the kind of matter and energy we know. But quantum mechanics describes the matter that makes up our world, our bodies, and the computer in front of you as barely physical at all. In fact, the ratio of the amount of matter in an atom to the total size of an atom is roughly that of a pea to a football field. The rest is energy in the form of forces and oscillations. If you took all the space out of the atoms making up the human body, the amount of solid matter left would be the size of a microscopic dot. Theoretically then, what separates us from discarnates is that dot.

Most of us believe that the hard sciences, such as physics and chemistry, conduct the most objective and most accurate tests in comparison to the softer sciences. But any particle physicist knows that there is no such thing as objectivity. We also assume that the hard sciences’ test results are more precisely measured and more consistent than those of other sciences.  If you really look closely at how scientific proof is achieved, you may be astonished to find that solid proof is not so solid. Dean Radin, senior scientist for The Institute of Noetic Science, gives many examples in his book, The Conscious Universe. One study he looks at was conducted by Larry Hedge of the University of Chicago. Hedge’s analysis compared the empirical replication rate for particle physics—the hardest of the hard sciences—with the empirical success in replication for social sciences. Both particle physics and social sciences showed a statistical inconsistency of 45%, that is, when all studies were taken into account. For reasons of design flaws or flukes, particle physicists discarded tests whose results were incompatible with expected ones. Since we now know that soft-science experiments can be as successfully replicated as those in hard sciences, we can assume that there is a potential design for replicable clinical tests on the continuation of organized consciousness outside of matter. I also suspect that the electrical energy of the dead—an energy my own body registers so strongly—could be precisely measured, which would yield quantifiable results. The technology sensitive enough to do so already exists.

Much of what the hard sciences propose as real is more often extrapolation from a set of effects rather than fact. If this and that are observed to happen, why they happen is deduced. From these deductions, a workable hypothesis is formed and then tested. We don’t really know, for instance, if there was ever a Big Bang. There has been no direct observation of this proposed cosmic event. That’s why the Hadron Collider was built, to attempt reproduction of how matter was born. The assumptions of a Big Bang or even a black hole are derived from a set of discernible conditions that can best be explained—in the current state of our knowledge—by a bang or a hole.

The evidence for survival already available satisfies the scientific criteria required for testing. First, there is a phenomenon in which it can be definitely stated that something real has happened because of its effects. That phenomenon could be anything from a recorded voice with no known source, a picture of a deceased individual picked up on film or a visitation from the deceased witnessed by more than one person simultaneously. Second, a very finite number of hypothetical causes from these effects can be extrapolated. And third, the hypothesis that best and most elegantly explains all the observable effects of a given phenomenon is the existence of organized consciousness outside the realm of matter.  The problem of replicating these effects under clinical conditions remains however. If the dead could be induced to participate, and they can be, we could test for other more quantifiable effects, especially in the electromagnetic range. Another obvious route would be the development of sensitive communication technology. The private sector that researches Instrumental Transcommunication, as it is called, has already made remarkable progress, sometimes with startling success. If only 1% of the money and expertise that went into the Hadron Collider were available (even better, 1% of the ten trillion spent on developing the atomic bomb), within a matter of a few years science could prove life after death.

  • blogger Blog this!
  • delicious Bookmark on Delicious
  • digg Digg this post
  • facebook Share on Facebook
  • gplus
  • myspace Share via MySpace
  • stumble Share with Stumblers
  • twitter Tweet about it
  • print Print for later
  • bookmark Bookmark in Browser

105 Comments

  1. Bhavani

    I lost my husband last week to brain tumor at 33. I really need some help to research and know about life after death. Understand the purpose of life. Want to comfort many unfortunate people like me with the answers which are so abstract now. Would appreciate guidance.

    Reply

    • Julia

      I’m so sorry for what you are going through. Losing a husband is hard enough but at such a young age! I have written a book about life after death, The Last Frontier: Exploring the Afterlife and Transforming Our Fear of Death. It is the most thorough book of its kind and has been highly praised by people in the afterlife studies field. Many people have written me that the book helped them tremendously, even changed their lives. I hope it helps you!

      Julia

      Reply

    • Trevor

      Then , i strictly suggest you reading risale i nur collection. You will find a lot in it , especially related to these three questions which are in the center of our lives; who we are, where we came from and where we are going. I especially suggest you reading ’10th word’ ( about the profound proves of afterlife) in the book of Words, which is one of this collection. I guarantee you that it includes the meaning you have been looking for.

      Reply

    • Marie

      I lost my only son..Brandon on Sept 8th 2013. He was only 29 when he died. Eleven months before that I lost my father and in between all that I fell down a flight of stairs and have damaged my si joints and have a bulging disc in my lower spine… between the physical pain and the tremendous emotional suffering I have felt like giving up. I find myself questioning everything…battleing with wanting to believe so much that I will see my son and my father again….but at the same time wondering…”is the “afterlife it all just a big fantasy story made up to comfort so many broken hearts? I will not deny that I have had a couple strange experiences since my son died…I have a clock in my kitchen and for each number on the clock there is a picture of different loved ones in my family…out of the 12 numbers there are two pictures of my son..one when he was about 4yrs old and the other of his as an adult. There have been times where I have been at my absolute lowest..thinking of my beautiful son…and for whatever reason at that exact moment I happened to have looked up at the clock…the big hand was pointing at him as an adult (3) and the little hand pointing at the (8) which is him as a small child. At first I thought maybe it was just coincidence…but it has happened several times and always at the exact moment that I am crying or thinking about him. I don’t know…I truly hope it means something. I had also prayed that I would dream of my son and I never did…(at least not that I remember upon waking up) but one night and it was over a year after he died..I did dream of him. I was walking towards a forest…it was a beautiful sunny day ..as I looked towards the trees I could see my son walking towards me…I still remember what he was wearing. He had on these gold coloured sports shorts (I remembered him wearing these when he was alive) and he had a white muscle type shirt on…I ran towards him and hugged him..and I said “But ..Brandon you died!..I remember him sitting down on this large boulder and he looked up at me and said..with this smile on his face..”But mom I didn’t die.” that is all I remember of the dream.. I look up at the night sky when I am all alone..and I think and I think..and I drive myself crazy wondering…”Is this it?” this can’t be! he was so strong a presence..there is no way he could be just gone ..forever….

      Reply

      • Julia

        Dear Marie, thank you for responding to others. The dream, the big dream with your son is the message–“I did not die!” I used to have doubts too, but after 40+ years working as a medium, the doubt are gone forever. Believe in your experiences. Most of all, believe in your beloved son’s message.

        Reply

    • Ste brown

      Our soul’s our conscience’s live on after death. We take our experience’s we have on earth with us. However in life after death there is no physical experience, there’s is no sight no touch nor sound, no taste nothing we experience on earth is experience again.Our conscience’s are all acknowledging and live on with out physical interaction. That is life after death, hence why we should enjoy every experience we can on the physical earth because afterwards it’s only conscious knowledge.

      Reply

      • Julia

        Although I agree that we should enjoy every experience we have on earth while we are here, it is incorrect to assume that there is no sensual experience. Touch, smell, taste, sight, etc., all of our senses are highly enhanced. People even cook and eat in the afterlife. Some smoke and drink whiskey especially after a battle death. The records, and my own experience as a medium, are full of instances in which people experience in an expanded way what we experience here.

        Reply

  2. Kirsten

    Bhavani, dry your eyes. After losing both parents two years apart, I went in a search for the afterlife and I found it. I have photographed many ghosts in my local cemetery, and I feel blessed to be able to ease the suffering of others with my work. My photos are genuine, and no other people were in that cemetery when I took the photos. Visit my page: Mystical Minnesota Paranormal on Facebook if you want to see them. Best wishes dear. Kirsten

    Reply

  3. John

    We lost our Beautiful 16 yr son last month. Before then I believed that when you die you die. Now I hope I’m wrong. My concern is the number of people out there who try to make a living out of peoples grief. If you truly believe, then you give people like us hope. If it wasn’t for my other two children, then I would not be here. I don’t fear death now, I need to know, I need my son.

    Reply

    • Julia

      John, I am so very sorry. You must be in terrible pain.

      You are wrong. Please read my book. The Last Frontier. It distinguishes actual proof from evidential material. There is little real proof of life after death. For me, after 40 years of experience with the other side, all I can say is–Survival is a fact! Not even electrons die, after all.

      Try communicating with your son on your own. I give a short “how-to” at the bottom of the homepage of this website. Try it. Direct contact tends to settle the question of survival after death.

      About people making money off grief. Doctors make money off of illnesses. What’s the difference? Lawyers off other problems. Insurance off fear. However, I’m truly unhappy with the commercialization of the afterlife topic, the angels, the near-death experience stars! But that’s America. Living in Europe as I do is a bit of a relief.

      Heartfelt condolences.

      Julia

      Reply

  4. Frederick Potter

    Perhaps there is a reason that any consciousness after death is hidden from us. Despite the efforts of Sam Parnia, Van Pimmel and others, this realm is hidden to the average person with the possible exceptions of those who have “died” and were subsequently resuscitated. While I have personally struggled with this question most of my life, I am moved by the friends that I have had who took their own lives. If we could prove that there was a better existence beyond this physical realm, would it not be incentive to go there when life here becomes too onerous? If we are here for a reason, whatever that may be, then willfully shuffling off this mortal coil may be contrary to our being here in the first place.

    On the other hand, if there is nothing but oblivion beyond this life, then nothing… not any amount of deaths, destruction, horror or holocaust have any meaning whatsoever. We would all be totally irrelevant.

    I would just really like to know the truth. It would help decide whether or not to pull that trigger.

    Reply

    • Julia

      Actually, Frederick, it’s quite easy to know where you’re going after death. It’s also easy to watch others go or to communicate with them afterward. We don’t know because of the fear that has been attached to death for the last two thousand plus years.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

*